Usually there’s no reason to get worried if you forget the password for an online service that you’re using. Platform providers are aware of their forgetful users and provide a simple method to reset your password and regain access to your account. All you need to do is to enter your email address and wait for a customized link. That link lets you change your password or request a new one.

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Yesterday I moved my old Prosody setup to a new Ejabberd-based XMPP server setup. I’d like to leave you a few notes on why and how I did that.

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By default LXD creates an internal network bridge called lxdbr0 which new containers are attached to (a network bridge in Linux is similar to a physical LAN switch). That way containers can talk to each other on the same network. Even the LXD host is connected to the same bridge. To make a service in a container reachable from the outside world, a proxy is used in most cases, e.g. Nginx for web services and HAProxy for any other services.

But what if you cannot or do not like to connect a service via a proxy? No problem! LXD can not only make use of a “host internal” network bridge, but any network bridge on your system. So let’s set up a network bridge that is linked to a public interface! The container’s network configuration will be similar to the one on your container host. A public IP address can be used directly.

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I’ve been using Restic backup on several servers for more than a year now. As the software turned out to be very reliable and fast I decided to give it a try on my laptop. Until now I had to trigger my backup mechanism by hand every day, but as you can image this is not a very reliable way to make backups.

Today I looked for a way to automate Restic backups on my laptop while keeping the mechanism easy and inconspicuous. In this post I’d like to introduce you to my personal backup solution.

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As you might know, I’m running metalhead.club, a Mastodon instance for metalheads. Due to the increasing storage and computing demand (and because I wanted to drop my old host) I decided to move the instance to my new, more powerful host. Luckily I’ve packed the whole instance and all its dependencies into a LXC container (with LXD as container manager) a couple of months ago. Usually you would restore your Ruby / NodeJS environment on your new host, transfer database and application files as well as media files and make sure everything fits. In my case it was basically just a file system transfer and re-import on the new LXD host: Much easier and less error prone.

In this post I’ll show you the exact steps how I moved my Mastodon instance yesterday.

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